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In partnership with the Provincial Government, Sport Nova Scotia, and Canadian Sport Institute Atlantic, we are happy to provide the most up-to-date resources, protocols, and guidelines for sport-related concussion in Nova Scotia.

We will continue to enhance this section with resources on a variety of concussion topics. We carefully choose these resources for you as they are from trusted sources and evidence-based. For more, click HERE to view our general concussion information and resources, or click HERE to view our full resource library.

A concussion is a brain injury that can affect how your brain works. Concussions may happen because of a hit to the head, face, neck or somewhere else on the body. When a hit takes place, the brain moves back and forth inside the skull. If it moves hard enough, the brain can become injured. This can make your brain and body work and feel different.

Concussion signs and symptoms may appear immediately or can evolve after several minutes or hours. A loss of consciousness is not required for the diagnosis of concussion. Concussions do not usually show up on medical investigations like blood work, MRIs or x-rays. They are diagnosed based on symptoms and mechanism of injury. Medical professionals can help rule out more serious conditions. If your symptoms are severe or getting worse with proper rest, or if you are not seeing any improvement in your symptoms after 48 hours of rest, contact a medical professional immediately.

Resources:
Concussion Awareness and Information Card (Brain Injury NS) >

Following a concussion, you may feel many different symptoms. Some symptoms may appear right away, and some may appear later. Some may appear when you start thinking or exercising. Some may be subtle and may go unnoticed by you but may be noticed by co-workers, teachers, friends, or family. No two concussions are the same. However, these are some common symptoms:

  • Headache
  • Memory problems
  • Difficulty concentrating/paying attention
  • Dizziness or balance problems
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Vision problems
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Fatigue or sleep problems
  • Mood changes

If you suspect you have had a concussion, stop playing, studying, working or driving. You should not be alone for 24-48 hours. You should go to a doctor or emergency department if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Severe or worsening headache
  • Sudden or severe vomiting
  • Weakness or tingling/burning in arms/legs
  • Increased confusion
  • Seizure or convulsion
  • Double vision
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Slurred speech or difficulty speaking
  • Increasingly restless, agitated, or combative behaviour
  • Fluid or bleeding from the ear or nose
  • Changes in behaviour:

Resources:

Concussion Recognition Tool, 5th edition (CRT5) >

A concussion is a brain injury that can affect how your brain works. Concussions may happen because of a hit to the head, face, neck or somewhere else on the body. When a hit takes place, the brain moves back and forth inside the skull. If it moves hard enough, the brain can become injured. This can make your brain and body work and feel different.

Concussion signs and symptoms may appear immediately or can evolve after several minutes or hours. A loss of consciousness is not required for the diagnosis of concussion. Concussions do not usually show up on medical investigations like blood work, MRIs or x-rays. They are diagnosed based on symptoms and mechanism of injury. Medical professionals can help rule out more serious conditions. If your symptoms are severe or getting worse with proper rest, or if you are not seeing any improvement in your symptoms after 48 hours of rest, contact a medical professional immediately.

Resources:
Concussion Awareness and Information Card (Brain Injury NS) >

Following a concussion, you may feel many different symptoms. Some symptoms may appear right away, and some may appear later. Some may appear when you start thinking or exercising. Some may be subtle and may go unnoticed by you but may be noticed by co-workers, teachers, friends, or family. No two concussions are the same. However, these are some common symptoms:

  • Difficulty concentrating/paying attention
  • Memory problems
  • Headache
  • Dizziness or balance problems
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Vision problems
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Fatigue
  • Mood changes
  • Sleep problems

If you suspect you have had a concussion, stop playing, studying, working or driving. You should not be alone for 24-48 hours. You should go to a doctor or emergency department if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Weakness or tingling/burning in arms/legs
  • Sudden or severe vomiting
  • Severe or worsening headache
  • Increasingly restless, agitated, or combative behaviour
  • Seizure or convulsion
  • Slurred speech or difficulty speaking
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Double vision
  • Increased confusion
  • Changes in behaviour
  • Fluid or bleeding from the ear or nose

Resources:
Concussion Recognition Tool, 5th edition (CRT5) >

Watch the videos below produced as part of Concussion Awareness Day featuring players, coaches, medical experts, and families in Nova Scotia sharing their stories of concussion and why it’s important to learn more:

A CONVERSATION ON CONCUSSION

Join athletes, coaches, officials, parents and experts in the field of Sports Medicine to explore concussion across Atlantic Canada. Created as part of 2022 Atlantic Concussion Awareness Day. Hosted by Adam Detienne, and featuring guests Dr. Tina Atkinson [MD CCFP (SEM)], Stephanie Cowle, Gail Macartney [RN-(NP), PhD],  Kita McRory, and Gordon Stringer.

2021 NS CONCUSSION AWARENESS DAY

Watch the excellent short videos below produced as part of 2021 NS Concussion Awareness Day featuring players and coaches in Nova Scotia sharing their stories of concussion:

View the full 50 minute NS Concussion Awareness Day event, including a panel of medical experts and host Bruce Rainnie discussing the topics covered the videos above and more during multiple panel discussions and a Q&A on sport concussion: